Official EyeFi CF Card Adapter

Cf adapter

One of the questions I’ve fielded often since the first edition of The iPad for Photographers is: How can I use an EyeFi card with a camera that takes only CF (Compact Flash) cards? All EyeFi cards are the smaller SD (Secure Digital) format, but some cameras—mostly professional bodies—use the larger CF size.

SD to CF adapters are available on Amazon and other outlets, but the reviews I’ve seen have always been spotty. Most adapters limit the range that the EyeFi’s Wi-Fi network creates.

Now, EyeFi has created its own adapter with a case made entirely of plastic to not blunt the Wi-Fi signal. EyeFi has more information and a list of supported cameras at its site: Eyefi certified CF Type II Adapter for Eyefi Mobi. The adapter costs $20.

Review: WD My Passport Wireless Hard Drive

WdfMP Wireless

Ever since I started writing the first edition of The iPad for Photographers, one aspect of the process has been a sticking point: image backup. I know, that sounds like the most boring part of being a photographer, but it’s also vitally important.

Importing photos onto the iPad for review is one option, but it takes up valuable storage (and digital camera files aren’t getting any smaller). That also means you have just one set of image files, unless you use the SD memory cards you originally captured the photos onto as backup (which is also a good idea).

A number of companies have made hard disks that incorporate Wi-Fi radios, primarily as a means of storing lots of media (movies, mostly) and stream them to the iPad and not take up the device’s storage. The Seagate Wireless Plus also added the ability to copy photos from the iPad to the drive, but its implementation is pretty basic and time-consuming: You need to import photos to the iPad, and then copy them to the drive.

All this is lead-up to a new product that makes the whole problem less thorny. The WD My Passport Wireless is a portable, battery-powered hard disk that adds one crucial element: an SD card reader. With this addition, you can dump the contents of a memory card while you’re shooting with another card, then connect to the drive on your iPad and review your work.

The drive is available in two configurations: 1 TB for $175 and 2 TB for $219. (Those are the current prices at Amazon as I write this; clicking either link earns me an affiliate percentage and helps support the work I do.)

My full review at Lynda.com is here: Review: My Passport Wireless for the Traveling Photographer.

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Derrick Story Reviews the WD My Passport Wireless HD

wdfMP_Wireless.jpg

My colleague Derrick Story got his hands on WD’s new My Passport Wireless hard disk, which he calls “the best new gadget I’ve tested in a while.” The My Passport Wireless includes an SD card, which is the essential ingredient for taking it on location: You can make a copy of your memory card’s photos without having to transfer them to the iPad first.

The drive comes in two configurations: 1 TB for $179 and 2 TB for $219. I’m looking forward to using this on my next photo excursion.

WD My Passport Wireless SD-Equipped Hard Drive

WdfMP Wireless

Now this looks interesting. WD has just announced the My Passport Wireless, an external hard drive that features a built-in SD card reader. Available in capacities of 1 TB and 2 TB, the drive includes its own Wi-Fi hotspot that can be connected to an iPad or iPhone using WD’s My Cloud app.

I’ve written about the Seagate Wireless Plus before, which is a wireless hard drive that can connect to an iPad. The benefit of WD’s My Passport Wireless over the Seagate drive is that SD card slot. While you’re on location, dump your photos onto the drive quickly without having to first transfer them to the iPad’s internal storage. Then you can review shots wirelessly, and have a backup, too. I can’t wait to get my hands on one to test.

The drive includes a USB 3.0 connector for transferring files to a computer. It can also stream media and share an Internet connection with up to 8 wirelessly connected devices. WD claims 6 hours of battery life while streaming media and 20 hours of standby time. The 1 TB model is listed at $179.99, while the 2 TB model is priced at $219.99.

[Originally spotted at PetaPixel]

New Article: Kinsgston MobileLite Wireless Review

Kensington mobilelite wireless 100312049 large

Is the storage on your iPad or iPhone filling up? At Macworld, I reviewed the Kingston MobileLite Wireless, a small device that stores media files on SD or micro SD cards and streams them via Wi-Fi to any iOS device. It can also charge your iPhone in a pinch! Read all about it: Kingston MobileLite Wireless review: SD card reader for your iPad or iPhone.

Cult of Mac Covers Mobile World Congress with iPhone and Eye-Fi

Charlie Sorrel at Cult of Mac details how he relied on his iPhone and an Eye-Fi card in a Fujifilm X100S camera to cover the Mobile World Congress this year. The event is the top venue for mobile phones and accessories. He writes:

A few years ago, when I first started covering the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, I would turn up with a DSLR, a couple of lenses, a CF card reader, a MacBook (and power cable) and a backpack to carry it all in. I’d have to go to the press lounge to find a power outlet and an Ethernet jack (the Wi-Fi back then was so bad it wasn’t worth trying, even in the press lounge).

Now I can literally turn up with the iPhone in my pocket and cover everything, and arguably do it better. I didn’t really need the X100S to do the job, but I took it anyway because it made the job more fun. That’s pretty neat right there.

Using Cameras’ Built-in Wi-Fi at CES

Derrick Story has an article at Macworld about how he used the built-in Wi-Fi capabilities of the Canon 70D and Olympus OM-D E-1 and their respective iOS apps to share images during the day when he attended CES (the Consumer Electronics Show) early this month. Manufacturers are finally getting the message that built-in Wi-Fi is useful and desired by photographers.

DPReview Compares Wi-Fi SD Cards

Eye Fi ProX2 16GB left view smDPReview compares two wireless SD cards, the Eye-Fi Pro X2 16 GB and the Transcend 32 GB Wi-Fi: Battle of the Wi-Fi Cards: Eye-Fi vs. Transcend. Although the Transcend offers more storage and costs less, the reviewer found that the Eye-Fi trounces it in performance, range, and software features. (The article doesn’t include the Eye-Fi Mobi card, which makes it easier to connect to a tablet or smartphone.)

But perhaps the biggest disadvantage of the Transcend card is its inability to easily transfer files to a laptop or desktop. Technically it can do it, but it’s a painstaking process and one that I wouldn’t consider practical. Basically, the card uses a computer to achieve the same thing it can do on a mobile device, only with twice the steps. Users must find the Transcend Wi-Fi card’s network from the computer. Next, the user launches a browser and enters a lengthy IP address into the url bar. At that point I was better off just plugging the card into the good old card reader. By comparison, the Eye-Fi can connect to a laptop in a matter of seconds and upload images and videos in real time.

[If you’re thinking of purchasing an Eye-Fi, please consider buying it using these Amazon links, which helps support my work. Thanks!]

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iUSBportCamera Update Adds Features

iUSBport on Camera

HyperDrive has released an update to its iUSBport app that drives the iUSBportCamera wireless device. The iUSBportCamera connects to your DSLR’s USB port and enables you to control the camera from your iPad.

According to the (minimal) release notes, the new app adds HDR and Time Lapse capture modes, background downloading, and updated firmware for the iUSBportCamera device.

I wasn’t able to include much information in the book about the iUSBportCamera due to time constraints—I didn’t receive a review unit until the book was sent to the printer—but its functions are very similar to the CameraMator described in Chapter 3. That’s because originally they were the same device: HyperDrive distributed the CameraMator until it and the original CameraMator design had a falling out. Now, the iUSBportCamera and the CameraMator share the same hardware. HyperDrive developed the iUSBportCamera and the designer is working on a new device called the CamNexus.

New Article: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS

Over at CreativePro, I look at the excellent PhotoSnitch utility for importing photos into an iPad: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS. Although I discussed the Eye-Fi software in the first edition of the book, I tossed that for the second edition and expanded on using ShutterSnitch because it just works.