Official EyeFi CF Card Adapter

Cf adapter

One of the questions I’ve fielded often since the first edition of The iPad for Photographers is: How can I use an EyeFi card with a camera that takes only CF (Compact Flash) cards? All EyeFi cards are the smaller SD (Secure Digital) format, but some cameras—mostly professional bodies—use the larger CF size.

SD to CF adapters are available on Amazon and other outlets, but the reviews I’ve seen have always been spotty. Most adapters limit the range that the EyeFi’s Wi-Fi network creates.

Now, EyeFi has created its own adapter with a case made entirely of plastic to not blunt the Wi-Fi signal. EyeFi has more information and a list of supported cameras at its site: Eyefi certified CF Type II Adapter for Eyefi Mobi. The adapter costs $20.

Review: WD My Passport Wireless Hard Drive

WdfMP Wireless

Ever since I started writing the first edition of The iPad for Photographers, one aspect of the process has been a sticking point: image backup. I know, that sounds like the most boring part of being a photographer, but it’s also vitally important.

Importing photos onto the iPad for review is one option, but it takes up valuable storage (and digital camera files aren’t getting any smaller). That also means you have just one set of image files, unless you use the SD memory cards you originally captured the photos onto as backup (which is also a good idea).

A number of companies have made hard disks that incorporate Wi-Fi radios, primarily as a means of storing lots of media (movies, mostly) and stream them to the iPad and not take up the device’s storage. The Seagate Wireless Plus also added the ability to copy photos from the iPad to the drive, but its implementation is pretty basic and time-consuming: You need to import photos to the iPad, and then copy them to the drive.

All this is lead-up to a new product that makes the whole problem less thorny. The WD My Passport Wireless is a portable, battery-powered hard disk that adds one crucial element: an SD card reader. With this addition, you can dump the contents of a memory card while you’re shooting with another card, then connect to the drive on your iPad and review your work.

The drive is available in two configurations: 1 TB for $175 and 2 TB for $219. (Those are the current prices at Amazon as I write this; clicking either link earns me an affiliate percentage and helps support the work I do.)

My full review at Lynda.com is here: Review: My Passport Wireless for the Traveling Photographer.

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Using Cameras’ Built-in Wi-Fi at CES

Derrick Story has an article at Macworld about how he used the built-in Wi-Fi capabilities of the Canon 70D and Olympus OM-D E-1 and their respective iOS apps to share images during the day when he attended CES (the Consumer Electronics Show) early this month. Manufacturers are finally getting the message that built-in Wi-Fi is useful and desired by photographers.

New Article: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS

Over at CreativePro, I look at the excellent PhotoSnitch utility for importing photos into an iPad: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS. Although I discussed the Eye-Fi software in the first edition of the book, I tossed that for the second edition and expanded on using ShutterSnitch because it just works.

Macworld Reviews the Seagate Wireless Plus

Over at Macworld, Roman Loyola reviewed the Seagate Wireless Plus Wi-Fi hard drive. Although he doesn’t mention this specific purpose, the Wireless Plus finally delivers on the promise of being able to transfer files from the iPad so you can back up the photos you import. See “Seagate Wireless Plus Appears” for more detail. I’ve been using the drive and like it.

Weekend Photo-ception with a CameraMator

A little weekend photo-ception! I’m taking a photo of the Canon EOS M and its 90EX flash using a Nikon D90. Connected to the D90 is a CameraMator wireless unit. And I’m controlling the camera from my iPad using the CameraMator app (the screenshot below). What you don’t see is that I’m sitting at my desk about 10 feet away, controlling the camera’s settings—not hunched over the camera (which needs to stay locked down for this product shot, so I don’t want to be touching it much anyway).

I do need to adjust the external flash settings from the camera on the D90 itself; I don’t have access to all of the D90’s menus, although that would be super cool.

I’m on deadline to finish my EOS M book soon, so I’ll have more time to play with and write about the CameraMator later.

Cameramator photoception