Part 2 of iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

The second article in my series at Lynda.com about using an iPad in the field for photography is now posted. (You can read the Part 1 here.) This one takes us out into the field itself, where I discuss the advantages and the how-to of reviewing photos on location. I talk about using the Apple camera adapters and also wireless options like the Eyefi, which lets you review shots on the iPad while you’re shooting. I also offer ideas for recording location information and getting on-the-spot model releases easily.

Here it is: iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

iPad literally in a field

Transfer Photos Wirelessly without the Camera

20131009-153426.jpg

In the “learn something new” department, I ran across an interesting discovery today.

First, some setup. I woke up before dawn to catch the sunrise in the Columbia River Gorge, and for some reason my camera’s battery didn’t last very long—I think it was the combination of the cold weather, composing my shots using Live View, and transferring the images from my Eye-Fi card to my iPad. With a full day of shooting ahead, and only one extra battery available, I was in trouble.

Jump ahead a few hours, I want to transfer my newest photos to the iPad but not kill the spare battery in the camera. So, I attach my iPad Camera Connection SD adapter to copy the photos directly. The problem is that connecting the SD card to the iPad using the adapter means I need to import the raw versions of my photos in addition to the JPEGs. (I’m shooting raw+JPEG so I can edit better-quality photos on the iPad than the previews generated by the camera.) What I want to do is import into ShutterSnitch which includes an option to copy only JPEG images.

That brings me to the surprise: I opened ShutterSnitch to see if it could import directly from the adapter (it can’t; Apple blocks access to the sync port, I believe), but suddenly the photos started importing anyway. The trick is that I’m using an Eye-Fi card. And when the card is connected to the iPad using the camera adapter, the iPad is also supplying the card with power, which in turn activates the Eye-Fi’s wireless hotspot.

So even though the card is physically connected to the iPad, it’s transferring images via Wi-Fi! Pretty cool when you don’t want to tax your camera battery and bypass the Camera Roll.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume mailing list that I use to announce new projects and items that I think my readers would be interested in. (It’s hosted by MailChimp, so if you decide I’ve gotten too chatty in the future, you can unsubscribe easily.)

Cedar Creek Grist Mill

20131008-150717.jpg

I’m at a photo workshop in Oregon and putting my iPad photography skills to work in the field. As I type this, I’m sitting in a van driving down the freeway from our last shoot, the Cedar Creek Grist Mill. Despite a lot of rain, I had a blast shooting this old structure and the water that runs alongside it. (Others in the group saw a few large salmon jumping up the falls, but I never spied one.)

But as we’re traveling, I took the opportunity to import my photos from my camera’s Eye-Fi wireless card onto my iPad (using ShutterSnitch), review them, and edit a couple in Apple’s iPhoto app. I’ll do more processing on the raw files later on my computer, but this gives me a chance to not only see what I captured, but also perform some basic edits and share a couple shots with friends… and write this post.

ShutterSnitch on the iPhone During Vacation

20130606-234203.jpg
In the second edition of The iPad for Photographers (which is available now!), I focus on using ShutterSnitch to import photos wirelessly from a camera using a Wi-Fi card such as the Eye-Fi to the iPad.

While I’ve been on vacation this week, however, I’ve been leaning on ShutterSnitch but using my iPhone instead. I’ve wanted to stay light while carrying gear around Disneyland, but “gear” also includes stuff to keep a 5-year-old fed and entertained for the day. (That includes lots of snacks, crayons, and paper for standing in long lines. I also have an iPod touch as a last resort, which so far hasn’t been needed.) And I haven’t been doing a great deal of photography. So although the iPad is light and portable, it’s still a bit of heft when my main goal isn’t photography.

My iPhone, though, is with me all the time, and ShutterSnitch works on all iOS devices, not just the iPad. The iPhone gives me three advantages over just taking photos with my camera: its Retina screen offers better previews of my photos; I can edit images using iPhoto, Photogene, or a bunch of other apps; and I can share those images easily.

Most shots have been of my daughter, so after importing photos into ShutterSnitch, I select a few, share them to the Camera Roll, and then send those to a Shared Photo Stream for family members to view instantly. I’ve also shared a few photos via Facebook and Flickr, also from the Camera Roll.

20130608-145300.jpg

Knowing that I’d be using my iPad and iPhone primarily, I’ve been shooting in Raw+JPEG format. That enables me to have raw files I can work with on my computer, but also have high-quality JPEGs for reviewing and sharing. ShutterSnitch includes a feature to transfer only JPEG files, dramatically cutting down the time it takes to transfer the files between camera and iPhone as well as reducing the amount of storage taken up by the images. I also turned on the highlight indicator to see where areas were getting blown out to white. (I discuss ShutterSnitch and its features in more detail in a CreativePro article that was just published: “ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS.”)

If I were more photo-focused on this trip, I’d probably stick to the iPad. (That’s my plan for an upcoming photo tour I’m taking in October.) But in this case, it’s been more convenient to use my iPhone as the device for reviewing and sharing photos. ShutterSnitch and an Eye-Fi card enabled me to do it anywhere I happened to be standing.

New Article: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS

Over at CreativePro, I look at the excellent PhotoSnitch utility for importing photos into an iPad: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS. Although I discussed the Eye-Fi software in the first edition of the book, I tossed that for the second edition and expanded on using ShutterSnitch because it just works.