iPad Photo Backup with a Raspberry Pi

Making backups of your photos while you’re on location is essential, and there are plenty of ways to do it. I own a WD My Passport Wireless hard disk that works well (and it’s been supplanted by the new My Passport Wireless Pro).

But for some people, the solution is to build it themselves. Lenin at Moving Electrons put together a package built around a Raspberry Pi to store and access photos from his iPad Pro. It’s definitely a more geeky approach, involving lots of custom code, but looks like a great project. Check it out here: Backup Photos While Traveling With an iPad Pro and a Raspberry Pi

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Derrick Story Reviews the WD My Passport Wireless HD

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My colleague Derrick Story got his hands on WD’s new My Passport Wireless hard disk, which he calls “the best new gadget I’ve tested in a while.” The My Passport Wireless includes an SD card, which is the essential ingredient for taking it on location: You can make a copy of your memory card’s photos without having to transfer them to the iPad first.

The drive comes in two configurations: 1 TB for $179 and 2 TB for $219. I’m looking forward to using this on my next photo excursion.

WD My Passport Wireless SD-Equipped Hard Drive

WdfMP Wireless

Now this looks interesting. WD has just announced the My Passport Wireless, an external hard drive that features a built-in SD card reader. Available in capacities of 1 TB and 2 TB, the drive includes its own Wi-Fi hotspot that can be connected to an iPad or iPhone using WD’s My Cloud app.

I’ve written about the Seagate Wireless Plus before, which is a wireless hard drive that can connect to an iPad. The benefit of WD’s My Passport Wireless over the Seagate drive is that SD card slot. While you’re on location, dump your photos onto the drive quickly without having to first transfer them to the iPad’s internal storage. Then you can review shots wirelessly, and have a backup, too. I can’t wait to get my hands on one to test.

The drive includes a USB 3.0 connector for transferring files to a computer. It can also stream media and share an Internet connection with up to 8 wirelessly connected devices. WD claims 6 hours of battery life while streaming media and 20 hours of standby time. The 1 TB model is listed at $179.99, while the 2 TB model is priced at $219.99.

[Originally spotted at PetaPixel]

Part 3 of iPad Photography in the Field: Rate, Tag, and Export Photos

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The third and last article in my iPad Photography in the Field series at Lynda.com is now up! It’s an extra long entry that covers how to use the iPad to sort your good photos from the not-so-good ones. It also explains how to apply essential metadata like keywords and IPTC information to your photos so you don’t need to do it later when you’re back at the computer, saving a ton of time.

Read the article here: iPad Photography in the Field: Rate, Tag, and Export Photos.

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Part 2 of iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

The second article in my series at Lynda.com about using an iPad in the field for photography is now posted. (You can read the Part 1 here.) This one takes us out into the field itself, where I discuss the advantages and the how-to of reviewing photos on location. I talk about using the Apple camera adapters and also wireless options like the Eyefi, which lets you review shots on the iPad while you’re shooting. I also offer ideas for recording location information and getting on-the-spot model releases easily.

Here it is: iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

iPad literally in a field

New Article: iPad Photography in the Field, Part 1

I have a new article up at Lynda.com, the first in a series of “iPad Photography in the Field” pieces that takes you on location to see how an iPad is useful for photographers.

Part 1, “Prepare for Adventure,” is all about the preparation: Using an iPad (and/or iPhone) to scout photo locations, plan ahead, learn which direction the light will be coming from, and more.

Ipad field tulip field

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Cedar Creek Grist Mill

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I’m at a photo workshop in Oregon and putting my iPad photography skills to work in the field. As I type this, I’m sitting in a van driving down the freeway from our last shoot, the Cedar Creek Grist Mill. Despite a lot of rain, I had a blast shooting this old structure and the water that runs alongside it. (Others in the group saw a few large salmon jumping up the falls, but I never spied one.)

But as we’re traveling, I took the opportunity to import my photos from my camera’s Eye-Fi wireless card onto my iPad (using ShutterSnitch), review them, and edit a couple in Apple’s iPhoto app. I’ll do more processing on the raw files later on my computer, but this gives me a chance to not only see what I captured, but also perform some basic edits and share a couple shots with friends… and write this post.

iUSBportCamera Update Adds Features

iUSBport on Camera

HyperDrive has released an update to its iUSBport app that drives the iUSBportCamera wireless device. The iUSBportCamera connects to your DSLR’s USB port and enables you to control the camera from your iPad.

According to the (minimal) release notes, the new app adds HDR and Time Lapse capture modes, background downloading, and updated firmware for the iUSBportCamera device.

I wasn’t able to include much information in the book about the iUSBportCamera due to time constraints—I didn’t receive a review unit until the book was sent to the printer—but its functions are very similar to the CameraMator described in Chapter 3. That’s because originally they were the same device: HyperDrive distributed the CameraMator until it and the original CameraMator design had a falling out. Now, the iUSBportCamera and the CameraMator share the same hardware. HyperDrive developed the iUSBportCamera and the designer is working on a new device called the CamNexus.

ShutterSnitch on the iPhone During Vacation

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In the second edition of The iPad for Photographers (which is available now!), I focus on using ShutterSnitch to import photos wirelessly from a camera using a Wi-Fi card such as the Eye-Fi to the iPad.

While I’ve been on vacation this week, however, I’ve been leaning on ShutterSnitch but using my iPhone instead. I’ve wanted to stay light while carrying gear around Disneyland, but “gear” also includes stuff to keep a 5-year-old fed and entertained for the day. (That includes lots of snacks, crayons, and paper for standing in long lines. I also have an iPod touch as a last resort, which so far hasn’t been needed.) And I haven’t been doing a great deal of photography. So although the iPad is light and portable, it’s still a bit of heft when my main goal isn’t photography.

My iPhone, though, is with me all the time, and ShutterSnitch works on all iOS devices, not just the iPad. The iPhone gives me three advantages over just taking photos with my camera: its Retina screen offers better previews of my photos; I can edit images using iPhoto, Photogene, or a bunch of other apps; and I can share those images easily.

Most shots have been of my daughter, so after importing photos into ShutterSnitch, I select a few, share them to the Camera Roll, and then send those to a Shared Photo Stream for family members to view instantly. I’ve also shared a few photos via Facebook and Flickr, also from the Camera Roll.

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Knowing that I’d be using my iPad and iPhone primarily, I’ve been shooting in Raw+JPEG format. That enables me to have raw files I can work with on my computer, but also have high-quality JPEGs for reviewing and sharing. ShutterSnitch includes a feature to transfer only JPEG files, dramatically cutting down the time it takes to transfer the files between camera and iPhone as well as reducing the amount of storage taken up by the images. I also turned on the highlight indicator to see where areas were getting blown out to white. (I discuss ShutterSnitch and its features in more detail in a CreativePro article that was just published: “ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS.”)

If I were more photo-focused on this trip, I’d probably stick to the iPad. (That’s my plan for an upcoming photo tour I’m taking in October.) But in this case, it’s been more convenient to use my iPhone as the device for reviewing and sharing photos. ShutterSnitch and an Eye-Fi card enabled me to do it anywhere I happened to be standing.

New Article: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS

Over at CreativePro, I look at the excellent PhotoSnitch utility for importing photos into an iPad: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS. Although I discussed the Eye-Fi software in the first edition of the book, I tossed that for the second edition and expanded on using ShutterSnitch because it just works.