Review: WD My Passport Wireless Hard Drive

WdfMP Wireless

Ever since I started writing the first edition of The iPad for Photographers, one aspect of the process has been a sticking point: image backup. I know, that sounds like the most boring part of being a photographer, but it’s also vitally important.

Importing photos onto the iPad for review is one option, but it takes up valuable storage (and digital camera files aren’t getting any smaller). That also means you have just one set of image files, unless you use the SD memory cards you originally captured the photos onto as backup (which is also a good idea).

A number of companies have made hard disks that incorporate Wi-Fi radios, primarily as a means of storing lots of media (movies, mostly) and stream them to the iPad and not take up the device’s storage. The Seagate Wireless Plus also added the ability to copy photos from the iPad to the drive, but its implementation is pretty basic and time-consuming: You need to import photos to the iPad, and then copy them to the drive.

All this is lead-up to a new product that makes the whole problem less thorny. The WD My Passport Wireless is a portable, battery-powered hard disk that adds one crucial element: an SD card reader. With this addition, you can dump the contents of a memory card while you’re shooting with another card, then connect to the drive on your iPad and review your work.

The drive is available in two configurations: 1 TB for $175 and 2 TB for $219. (Those are the current prices at Amazon as I write this; clicking either link earns me an affiliate percentage and helps support the work I do.)

My full review at Lynda.com is here: Review: My Passport Wireless for the Traveling Photographer.

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Article: Make Photo Gifts Right from Your iPhone or iPad

Print gifts finished book2

Still looking for holiday gift ideas? Start with the photos in your iPhone or iPad! Over at Lynda.com, I’ve written about methods for making photo gifts without requiring a trip to your computer. Apps and services can make prints, photo books, and other creations while you wait in line to see Santa.

I also spotlight a couple of interesting photo book options: Chatbooks and Groovebook are designed to make small books out of all of your mobile photos (with the ability to skip shots you don’t like, of course) inexpensively. Chatbooks charges $6 for a 60-page book, while Groovebook works as a subscription that costs $2.99 per month for a book of 40 to 100 pages.

This was a fun article to research. Check it out here: Make Photo Gifts Right from Your iPhone or iPad.

Raw vs JPEG in Photoshop, a Practical View

Raw jpeg top

While I was traveling last week, Lynda.com published an article of mine that looks at the (digital) age-old question of whether to shoot in Raw or JPEG format. Often this topic is pitched as a fight, and because photographers on the Internet are photographers on the Internet, people draw battle lines and argue.

The reality, though, is that both formats are good, depending on your needs. That’s not as dramatic, but who has time to bicker? I’d rather be out shooting photos. In this article, I look at practical considerations, specifically related to working with photos in Photoshop (otherwise the scope is just too massive for an article).

It was also an opportunity to photograph a shot of bourbon, which then became its own post-shoot reward!

Here’s the article: Raw vs. JPEG in Photoshop: A Practical View. I’d love to hear your feedback in the comments below (Lynda.com articles don’t have comments).

Whiskey shot cropped

Part 3 of iPad Photography in the Field: Rate, Tag, and Export Photos

iPad field3 bikes

The third and last article in my iPad Photography in the Field series at Lynda.com is now up! It’s an extra long entry that covers how to use the iPad to sort your good photos from the not-so-good ones. It also explains how to apply essential metadata like keywords and IPTC information to your photos so you don’t need to do it later when you’re back at the computer, saving a ton of time.

Read the article here: iPad Photography in the Field: Rate, Tag, and Export Photos.

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Part 2 of iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

The second article in my series at Lynda.com about using an iPad in the field for photography is now posted. (You can read the Part 1 here.) This one takes us out into the field itself, where I discuss the advantages and the how-to of reviewing photos on location. I talk about using the Apple camera adapters and also wireless options like the Eyefi, which lets you review shots on the iPad while you’re shooting. I also offer ideas for recording location information and getting on-the-spot model releases easily.

Here it is: iPad Photography in the Field: Review Photos on Location

iPad literally in a field

New Article: iPad Photography in the Field, Part 1

I have a new article up at Lynda.com, the first in a series of “iPad Photography in the Field” pieces that takes you on location to see how an iPad is useful for photographers.

Part 1, “Prepare for Adventure,” is all about the preparation: Using an iPad (and/or iPhone) to scout photo locations, plan ahead, learn which direction the light will be coming from, and more.

Ipad field tulip field

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Split Raw+JPEG Files on the iPad

If you shoot Raw+JPEG in anticipation of working with the photos on your iPad (as I recommend in my book), you’re bound to run into the problem of storage. Raw files occupy a lot of space, and are mostly ignored when working with images on the iPad. In his latest Practicing Photographer video at Lynda.com, photographer Ben Long (who has one of the best voices on the Internet, I swear) demonstrates how to use the app PhotosInfoPro to “split” the raw file from the JPEG for each image, enabling you to delete the raw files and keep the JPEGs. (Make sure you keep the raw files on your memory card, of course.)

Benlong raw jpeg lynda photosinfopro

The video is free until the next episode is posted, so check it out now while it’s still online. Or, you can read about how to do it at the Lynda.com blog.

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