Check Your Apps Before Upgrading to iOS 9

Today is release day for iOS 9 (10 a.m. PST), which means (1) Apple’s servers will probably be slammed all day and it could take a long time to download and install the update, and (2) not all third-party apps are ready for the new operating system.

Before you apply the free upgrade, make sure any apps you rely on work properly. So far I’ve seen updates to ShutterSnitch, The Photographer’s Ephemeris, Handy Photo, and Flickr, to name a few photo-related apps. Others may already work fine with iOS 9 without a special update. And at least two are specifically not ready yet: CamRanger and Fujifilm Cam Remote.

I’ve been running iOS 9 betas for several weeks with few issues, but it’s always good to be cautious right when major new operating systems are sent to the wider world. Be sure to make an encrypted backup via iTunes before you update; that retains a lot of passwords and other information that you’d otherwise have to provide during the update process.

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Article: Take Better DSLR Shots Using… Your Smartphone?

IUSBportCamera Hanging sm

Macworld has just published an article of mine that was fun to write: “Take Better DSLR Shots Using… Your Smartphone?” I look at three devices that control a DSLR wirelessly using an iOS device: the CamRanger, CameraMator, and iUSBportCamera. Although similar in general, each device has its own advantages and disadvantages, which I detail in the article. From the introduction:

Photos are meant to be viewed large. Yet when taking a shot—that crucial moment when we should be most discerning—we usually rely on the camera’s small LCD to preview the image. The traditional solution has been to “tether” the camera to a computer, so you can view shots on a large screen as they’re captured, or even control the camera’s settings and trigger the shutter remotely. That approach lets you correct the scene or settings and reshoot immediately if anything looks amiss.

But tethering can be limiting. Setting up a laptop on location is often inconvenient—and even if you’re shooting in a studio, tethering typically involves snaking a USB cable between the camera and the computer.

I think the headline is a little misleading, since I specifically talked about using an iPad and the iUSBportCamera app is just for the iPad. But I can understand that “smartphone” is likely to draw a bigger audience.