New Articles: Lightroom mobile 1.1 and Adobe Photoshop Mix

Coinciding with the latest announcements from Adobe, two articles of mine were published this morning.

Lightroom mobile 1.1

Mix cutout

For my first article at Lynda.com, I looked at Lightroom mobile 1.1. On the surface it appears to be an incremental update that delivers iPhone compatibility (which Adobe promised was coming when Lightroom mobile came out in April). However, it turns out that having the app on the iPhone can potentially change the way you work with mobile photos.

Right now, to get the shots you capture with the iPhone (and if you’re like me, you take a lot) into your Lightroom library, you need to connect the phone to your computer via a sync cable and import the photos like any other camera. Using the feature of Lightroom mobile 1.1 to automatically add new photos from the Camera Roll to a synced collection means your photos get zapped to your Lightroom library without any intervention.

Read more about it at: How Lightroom Mobile 1.1 May Change Your Mobile Photo Workflow.

Adobe Photoshop Mix

LRmobile stars ipad

Over at Macworld, I wrote a first-look article about Adobe’s new Photoshop Mix app for iPad. It’s an interesting use of the underlying Photoshop technologies that Adobe is putting into many of its apps, enabling you to perform image corrections on photos and also build compositions from different photos.

Take a look at: First Look: Adobe Photoshop Mix.

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New Article: Kinsgston MobileLite Wireless Review

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Is the storage on your iPad or iPhone filling up? At Macworld, I reviewed the Kingston MobileLite Wireless, a small device that stores media files on SD or micro SD cards and streams them via Wi-Fi to any iOS device. It can also charge your iPhone in a pinch! Read all about it: Kingston MobileLite Wireless review: SD card reader for your iPad or iPhone.

Article: Tips for iPad Photo Retouching

iPad RetouchingThe iPad is a great photo viewer, but does it have enough oomph to handle photo retouching? Yes! In my latest article at Peachpit.com, I look at several ways to edit photos on the iPad, including red-eye removal, removing unwanted objects in the image, and compositing: Tips for iPad Photo Retouching

Article: Take Great Photos with Your iPad

Ipad mini shooting

It’s getting hard to escape it. This weekend, I visited the Ballard Locks and in the below-ground viewing area for the fish ladder (a series of “gates” the Army Corps of Engineers created to enable salmon to safely pass through the locks and spawn in fresh water) a tourist was taking photos of the fish…using an iPad. What used to be a weird anomaly is now turning into a regular occurrence.

At first, I ridiculed the idea—mostly because the camera-equipped iPad at the time was the iPad 2, which had a ridiculously bad camera. Fortunately, the cameras in later models have improved dramatically, and the form factor of the iPad mini makes it feel less like you’re holding a lunch tray in front of your face.

All this is to mention that I wrote a short article for Peachpit’s Web site that looks at the possibilities for using your iPad as a camera, including other software that improves the results: Take Great Photos with Your iPad.

Article: Tag summer travel photos with GPS info

Summer isn’t over yet, and my latest Seattle Times Practical Mac column looks at options for capturing GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) location data to record where your photos are taken. I talk about using an iPhone or other GPS-enabled smartphone to grab locations by shooting reference photos alongside the shots you take with a digital camera, as well as recording tracklogs that keep up with your location and then merging that data with your photos later. Link: Tagging your summer travel photos with GPS location info.

Article: Take Better DSLR Shots Using… Your Smartphone?

IUSBportCamera Hanging sm

Macworld has just published an article of mine that was fun to write: “Take Better DSLR Shots Using… Your Smartphone?” I look at three devices that control a DSLR wirelessly using an iOS device: the CamRanger, CameraMator, and iUSBportCamera. Although similar in general, each device has its own advantages and disadvantages, which I detail in the article. From the introduction:

Photos are meant to be viewed large. Yet when taking a shot—that crucial moment when we should be most discerning—we usually rely on the camera’s small LCD to preview the image. The traditional solution has been to “tether” the camera to a computer, so you can view shots on a large screen as they’re captured, or even control the camera’s settings and trigger the shutter remotely. That approach lets you correct the scene or settings and reshoot immediately if anything looks amiss.

But tethering can be limiting. Setting up a laptop on location is often inconvenient—and even if you’re shooting in a studio, tethering typically involves snaking a USB cable between the camera and the computer.

I think the headline is a little misleading, since I specifically talked about using an iPad and the iUSBportCamera app is just for the iPad. But I can understand that “smartphone” is likely to draw a bigger audience.

New Article: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS

Over at CreativePro, I look at the excellent PhotoSnitch utility for importing photos into an iPad: ShutterSnitch, the Wireless Photo Assistant for iOS. Although I discussed the Eye-Fi software in the first edition of the book, I tossed that for the second edition and expanded on using ShutterSnitch because it just works.