Raw Support Coming to iOS 10

Well now, this is interesting. PetaPixel spotted a feature in one of the slides during yesterday’s WWDC keynote that reads: “RAW photo editing.” We don’t yet know the details, but if iOS finally supports raw images, that could be a giant leap for mobile photo workflows. Raw is typically where the iPad has thrown a wrench into the works (as I describe in my book and elsewhere).

iOS 10 is available now to developers, with a public beta coming in July. The update will be available for everyone in the fall when we’ll see new iPhone models. I would bet (and the PetaPixel article brings up) that we’ll see some sort of raw capture on the new iPhones and perhaps the iPad, too.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

USB 3 Lightning to SD Card Reader Now Available

Lightning sd card usb3

Apple now offers for sale a new Lightning to SD Card Reader with two noticeable improvements over the current one: It supports USB 3 speeds on the iPad Pro, and in an unexpected but welcome surprise, allows you to import photos to an iPhone, not just an iPad.

The adapter costs $29 and, according to the online Apple Store, ships as early as next week.

Update: Sachin Patel on Twitter points out that iOS 9.2, also released today, adds iPhone support to the existing Lightning to the SD Card Adapter. No need to buy the new one if you don’t have an iPad Pro.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume newsletter that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Help me evaluate the state of the iPad for photography


[Update: The results are here!]

In 2012 I saw the potential of the iPad (then on its second generation) as a tool that photographers could take advantage of, and pitched my editors at Peachpit Press to write a book about it. The result was The iPad for Photographers, which is currently in its third edition.

The iPad is now five years old, so I’d love to discover how photographers are currently using the iPad in their workflows. Is it a crucial tool? An occasional benefit? Do you organize and edit photos? I would appreciate it if you could take just a few minutes to fill out a short survey. I’ll publish the results soon after the survey closes on September 30.

[Note: The end date was originally September 25, but I’ve been busy as heck and would like to give the survey a little more time to gain more responses. More data is better!]

Also, I will select one person at random (from the list of people who choose to include their name and email address) and send them a print copy of each of three of my latest books: Photos for OS X and iOS; The Connected Apple Family; and The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition.

Go to the survey here: The iPad for Photographers Usage Poll, September 2015

New Book! Photos for OS X and iOS


Apple is in the middle of a dramatic overhaul of its photo software, discontinuing iPhoto and Aperture and replacing them with the new Photos for OS X. Since iPhoto was the pre-installed, easy-to-use application for managing digital photos on the Mac, millions of people use it for their photo libraries. But Photos for OS X isn’t just an update to iPhoto—it’s a complete rewrite that often looks and behaves differently than its predecessor, designed to work with the Photos app on iPhones and iPads and with the new iCloud Photo Library.

This is where my new book comes in! The full title is Photos for OS X and iOS: Take, edit, and share photos in the Apple photography ecosystem, and it covers the whole shebang, such as:

  • How to capture photos and videos using an iPhone or iPad (even the Apple Watch!)
  • Smart strategies for converting iPhoto and Aperture libraries, and what changes when you switch to Photos for OS X
  • Importing photos from any camera
  • How to set up and use iCloud Photo Library, and understand its occasional quirks
  • How to edit photos on the Mac (which is more capable than you might think!) and on iOS devices
  • Creating prints, photo books, calendars, and slideshows

I’ve packed a lot of information into 200 pages, along with full-color photos, lots of screenshots, and plenty of answers. The book is now available in stores and from online retailers for as little as $18. (If you order the print or ebook versions from Amazon.com or directly from Peachpit, I get a small commission that helps to support the work I do. Peachpit also offers a bundle that includes the print book and ebook files—PDF, EPUB, and MOBI.)

To celebrate the launch, I’m giving away five copies of the ebook version! To be eligible, all you have to do is sign up for my newsletter. You’re welcome to unsubscribe after the drawing if you’d like; the newsletter is a way for me to get to know my readers better, announce new projects, and do giveaways like this. I’ll pick the five winners randomly on Monday, August 10, 2015.

Here’s a selection of pages from the book to give you an idea of what you’ll find. I really like how it turned out:

Pre-order The iPad for Photographers, Third Edition!

iPad for Photographers Third EditionHot on the presses, the third edition of The iPad for Photographers is done and being printed! I can’t wait for you to see the finished version, which has been updated to cover iOS 7, more wireless options, Lightroom mobile, a dedicated workflow chapter, and more. I also had fun re-shooting many of the chapter opener images. Based on typical printing, ebook conversion, and distribution schedules, the new edition should be available mid-June. Pre-order it now.

Chapter 7 opener

Available Now: Canon EOS M: From Snapshots to Great Shots

Canon EOS M Great Shots sRGB 150pxI’m hard at work on the second edition of The iPad for Photographers, but in the meantime I’m proud to announce that the book I just completed, Canon EOS M: From Snapshots to Great Shots, is now available! Over at jeffcarlson.com, I wrote about why this title is especially important to me as a photographer.

Here’s a secret: If you really want to learn about something, write a book about it. Even if you know the material—in my case, digital photography—it’s another thing to turn around and teach that knowledge. You’ll gain a deeper knowledge, guaranteed.