iPad 2 Replaced by 4th-Gen iPad

It looks like Apple’s supply of iPad 2s has finally tapped out. As of yesterday, the least expensive full-size iPad option is now the fourth-generation iPad instead of the iPad 2. That’s great news for anyone who wants an iPad but can’t afford the iPad Air.

The 4th-gen iPad comes in only a 16 GB configuration, in black or white, for $399 (or $529 for the LTE cellular-equipped model). The differences between this iPad and the iPad 2 is striking: the 4th-gen iPad boasts a vastly better processor, more graphics capabilities, more working memory (1 GB compared to the iPad 2’s 512 MB), and of course the high-resolution Retina display. This model will definitely have a longer useful life than if you were to buy an iPad 2.

(Source: Apple and TechHive)

iOS 7.1 Now Out, Causes Photosmith Hiccup

Apple released iOS 7.1 today, finally conquering the dreaded crashing bug that would force the device into what appeared to be a restart (actually it was the app that lists the applications, internally called Springboard, that was crashing and bringing up the Apple logo screen). Macworld runs down some of the other changes, but as far as I can tell nothing else directly applies to photographers using iPads. The only camera-related improvement is a new Auto HDR setting, but it applies only to the iPhone 5s, not the iPad.

However, the folks over at C2 Enterprises note that iOS 7.1 introduced a bug that crashes Photosmith when importing images from the Camera Roll. The crash doesn’t affect the images you import—everything completes successfully—but you’re kicked back to the applications screen. They write:

This app crash isn’t as catastrophic as it appears – It’s a display-only bug, and your photos and metadata are perfectly safe. No data loss will result from this crash. Restarting Photosmith after the import crash will show all your previously imported photos in Photosmith’s catalog (including the photos imported just prior to the crash). You may continue working as your normally would in Photosmith.

More importantly, Photosmith will continue functioning as it did prior to updating to iOS 7.1. Importing photos via Eye-Fi, FTP, iTunes, or when syncing with Lightroom, isn’t impacted by this issue. This is an issue specific with how we’re handing the import dialog window after the import is completed. Instead of closing the import window and displaying the normal Photosmith interface, the entire Photosmith app shuts down.

Part of the issue is that Apple didn’t release a “final” build to developers before releasing iOS 7.1; the devs discovered the bug in the shipping version.

Nonetheless, iOS 7.1 has been in the works for a while, and I’m glad it’s here.

Road to Macworld: Talking about My Upcoming Sessions

The yearly Macworld/iWorld conference is coming up at the end of March, and I’m involved in three sessions this year! I spoke to Chuck Joiner last week for his show MacVoices about “the Road to Macworld,” offering a preview of my topics: a panel about digital photography workflows, how to take control of your photos on a Mac, and the iPad for photographers.

As a speaker, I also get to pass along deals like this: Until March 14, you can take advantage of $100 off the price of a conference admission to Macworld/iWorld. If you’re planning to attend the event, please come to one of my sessions and say hi, or if there’s enough interest maybe we can have an informal meetup.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume mailing list that I use to announce new projects, items, and giveaways that I think my readers would be interested in.

Cult of Mac Covers Mobile World Congress with iPhone and Eye-Fi

Charlie Sorrel at Cult of Mac details how he relied on his iPhone and an Eye-Fi card in a Fujifilm X100S camera to cover the Mobile World Congress this year. The event is the top venue for mobile phones and accessories. He writes:

A few years ago, when I first started covering the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, I would turn up with a DSLR, a couple of lenses, a CF card reader, a MacBook (and power cable) and a backpack to carry it all in. I’d have to go to the press lounge to find a power outlet and an Ethernet jack (the Wi-Fi back then was so bad it wasn’t worth trying, even in the press lounge).

Now I can literally turn up with the iPhone in my pocket and cover everything, and arguably do it better. I didn’t really need the X100S to do the job, but I took it anyway because it made the job more fun. That’s pretty neat right there.

Feedback for the Third Edition

I’m happy to share that I’ll soon be working on a third edition of The iPad for Photographers! I’d love to get your feedback on a few things:

  • Which topics need more/less attention?

  • Is there anything you expected in the book that needs to be added?

  • Do you find the QR codes in the margins helpful for following the links to apps and Web sites?

Please reply in the comments or email me at jeff@necoffee.com. Thanks!