Shawn Blanc: Grandpa’s iPad

Great, touching post by Shawn Blanc about his grandfather, who is legally blind, using the iPad as a camera:

At first, I wanted to snicker. But how could I? If my Grandpa wants to use an iPad to take a picture of his grandson and great grandson, then who cares? Certainly not me.

My Grandpa’s iPad has enabled him to do something that he’s been unable to do for as long as I can remember. The 9.7-inch touch screen has turned my Grandpa into a photographer.

Rumors of an iPad companion app for Lightroom surface

Last week, 9to5Mac posted an article about a leak on Adobe’s Web site that revealed what appears to be a Lightroom app for the iPad. According to the leak, the app would be a service that costs $99 per year (or may be included in a Creative Cloud subscription).

A Lightroom app for iPad was teased by Adobe’s Tom Hogarty earlier last year when he showed a very early proof-of-concept app that could edit raw files with apparent ease (on an iPad 2, no less).

There’s no indication of whether the app is imminent or still in development (and I wonder if the subscription pricing might be an intentional test balloon to see how people would react to the pricing). But it’s definitely an exciting development.

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Using Cameras’ Built-in Wi-Fi at CES

Derrick Story has an article at Macworld about how he used the built-in Wi-Fi capabilities of the Canon 70D and Olympus OM-D E-1 and their respective iOS apps to share images during the day when he attended CES (the Consumer Electronics Show) early this month. Manufacturers are finally getting the message that built-in Wi-Fi is useful and desired by photographers.

iPad for Photographers featured in Amazon’s ‘Resources for New Photographers’

Amazon.com has created a new Featured Reading List called “Resources for New Photographers,” and my book appears along with a host of great company (McNally, Kelby, Arena, Batdorf, Foster, and others). All nine books look good—I’ve read about half of them, and several ‘Snapshots to Great Shots’ titles appear on the list. Go check them out, improve your photography, and view a lot of great images.

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Split Raw+JPEG Files on the iPad

If you shoot Raw+JPEG in anticipation of working with the photos on your iPad (as I recommend in my book), you’re bound to run into the problem of storage. Raw files occupy a lot of space, and are mostly ignored when working with images on the iPad. In his latest Practicing Photographer video at Lynda.com, photographer Ben Long (who has one of the best voices on the Internet, I swear) demonstrates how to use the app PhotosInfoPro to “split” the raw file from the JPEG for each image, enabling you to delete the raw files and keep the JPEGs. (Make sure you keep the raw files on your memory card, of course.)

Benlong raw jpeg lynda photosinfopro

The video is free until the next episode is posted, so check it out now while it’s still online. Or, you can read about how to do it at the Lynda.com blog.

If you like the work I do, please consider signing up for my low-volume mailing list that I use to announce new projects and items that I think my readers would be interested in. (It’s hosted by MailChimp, so if you decide I’ve gotten too chatty in the future, you can unsubscribe easily.)