PhotoActive Episode 40: Geotagging with HoudahGeo

New PhotoActive episode! We welcome Pierre Bernard, developer of the Mac application HoudahGeo, to talk about geotagging and how it’s beneficial for photographers (or even folks on vacation). Take a listen and subscribe to the podcast here: Episode 40: Location Exploration with HoudahGeo.

Houdah is also the sponsor of this episode, and in the show notes, you can get HoudahGeo for 30% off!

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How to Use Lightroom Mobile while Traveling

One of my photo workshop participants wrote with a question: She’s going on a trip and wants to use her iPad and Lightroom Mobile just for the trip, without syncing her existing photo library to the device. Is it possible?

In my latest article for CreativePro, I explain how to use the iPad as a blank slate just for a trip like this, and how to make sure the photos she imports while away are automatically included in her larger photo library when she gets home.

Read it here: How to Use Lightroom Mobile for Temporary Travel

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Lightroom CC Mobile Review

When my editor at Download.com asked if I could write a review of Lightroom CC Mobile, I figured it would be an easy assignment. I’ve used the mobile version of Lightroom since before the first version was released, publishing an ebook that coincided with the software’s introduction, and have written extensively about the software as it’s evolved.

Well, 2700 words later, the review is now available. There was a lot to say, because the software has grown a lot since that initial version. I cover its organization, editing, and sharing features, and point out areas of frustration and suggestions for the future. This review looks at just the iOS version.

Take a look here: Adobe Lightroom for iOS Review: Industrial-strength image-editing tools on your iPhone or iPad.

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Using iOS Shortcuts to Import Photos into Lightroom CC Mobile

An ongoing frustration with the iPad photo workflow is that everything must pass through the Photos app. If you use another app such as Lightroom CC for iPad or iPhone, you end up with duplicates of everything: the copies of your images in Lightroom, plus the ones that were originally imported into Photos.

A recent update to Lightroom on iOS added compatibility with Shortcuts, Apple’s architecture for automating all sorts of things. In this video, Brian Matiash shows you how to configure a shortcut that takes the previous import into the Photos app, imports those images into Lightroom, and then deletes them from Photos.

Shawn Blanc’s iPad Photo Workflow

Shawn Blanc of The Sweet Setup skipped town this summer, spending a month with his family living in Colorado instead of his home in Kansas City.

The temporary digs meant packing light, so he took just his Leica Q camera and his iPad Pro for photography. In “My iPad Photography Workflow,” Shawn breaks down how he edits and manages his shots. For instance, although he captured Raw+JPEG images using the Leica, he found himself usually transferring (wirelessly) the JPEGs because they were more convenient.

It’s a good read, and, as he says at the end, a teaser for an upcoming mobile photography course.

(Photo by Shawn Blanc)

Affinity Photo for iPad Review

As someone who’s been using the iPad for editing and working with photos since the very beginning, even I was surprised by how capable Affinity Photo for iPad is. The power of the iPad Pro makes a big difference, yes, but Serif has delivered a full-featured image editor that doesn’t feel compromised.

Over at DPReview, I review Affinity Photo for iPad and give it high marks. Go check it out: Affinity Photo for iPad Review.

We’ve come to expect less from iOS software on the iPad compared to desktop applications because, in most cases, they’re mobile—and “mobile” has traditionally meant “limited.” A lot of that has been due to hardware: even as the iPad’s main processors improved, most models included a minimal amount of RAM that made it difficult to pull off operations expected of a modern image editor, such as smoothly dealing with many layers and real-time effects.

The arrival of the iPad Pro, along with a commitment in iOS to take advantage of the hardware, has opened the door for more powerful applications. One of those apps is Affinity Photo for iPad, a full-fledged image editor that doesn’t feel as if the developers had to remove features from a whiteboard to make the app a reality.

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How to Safely Clean iMovie Files from iPhone or iPad

Even though iOS devices are (finally) more generous with storage, it’s all too easy to fill them up. Recently when I was looking for old data to expunge, I realized iMovie for iOS was hogging about 3 GB. If you also have old projects just taking up space, I wrote an article for Macworld about how to safely export and delete them so you don’t lose the ability to edit them later.

Read it here: How to safely clean iMovie files from your iPhone or iPad.

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Seattle Times: iPad Pro and Finder Tricks

In my latest Practical Mac column for the Seattle Times, I share my thoughts after using the new 10.5-inch iPad Pro for several weeks. Spoiler: I like it a lot. However, if you bought the previous iPad Pro recently—say, in late November, like I did—you won’t see as dramatic of an upgrade. Though the larger screen is sure nice.

I also share some practical tips for working in the Finder on the Mac. It’s one of those things we do so often that we don’t think about it, and yet there’s a lot of power that you may not realize (including one or two things I didn’t even know about until I started deliberately poking around!).

Read the column here, and feel free to comment below with your thoughts: A look at the new iPad Pro, and handy Finder tricks.

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Lightroom mobile Adds Selective Brush, New iPad Interface, and More

Lightroom_mobile_July_2017

Recently I needed to grab some screenshots of Lightroom mobile on the iPad and realized that I’d been running a beta for quite a while. I deleted the beta and re-loaded the release version and was momentarily taken aback: it seemed so basic compared to what I’ve been using!

Now everyone gets to experience the reverse of my awe, with today’s release of new versions of Lightroom mobile for iOS (and Android). Highlights that I particularly like include:

  • Selective Brush: When Adobe added gradient masks, Lightroom mobile became much more versatile, especially when editing landscape photos. Now, there’s a brush tool for painting masked areas or removing areas from gradients (like mountains that poke up into a sky you want to darken).
  • Details Pane: At last, you can apply Lightroom’s sharpening and noise-reduction tools to an image or a mask, instead of pounding away at it with the Clarity slider.
  • Redesigned iPad Interface: The editing tools are now accessible by tapping an Edit button, separating it from the Info interface (and the Rate & Review interface on the iPhone). This does have a drawback, though, in that the editing controls take up an awfully large section of the screen at the expense of the image you’re editing.

Lightroom mobile is free to use, although a Creative Cloud subscription is required to sync photos and collections between devices.

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iPad Pro Is Now a True Photographer’s Tool

Has the iPad Pro finally become a true photographer’s tool? A year and a half ago, with the release of the first 12.9-inch iPad Pro, it was so close… but there were still some significant limitations.

Now, with the latest iPad Pro models, I think we’re finally there. Improved hardware is part of the story—USB 3 speeds at import, finally, for both sizes—and software is catching up. And the possibilities that will come with iOS 11 in the fall are still more intriguing.

At Macworld, I explain in more detail: The iPad Pro: Now a true photographer’s tool.

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