Macworld Reviews iPhoto 2.0 for iOS

Macworld’s Jackie Dove has published her review of iPhoto 2.0 for iOS, the new version of Apple’s mobile photo editor for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. She likes it quite a bit, writing:

iPhoto 2.0 for iOS is a fantastic upgrade to Apple’s mobile consumer image editing flagship program; its streamlined, updated interface is a joy to use. Though not as cute and whimsical as last year’s debut version, its swift operation, direct controls, enhanced sharing, and no-nonsense interface make it a must-have upgrade.

Other pressing deadlines have kept me from digging into the new version in depth, but it’s still the photo editor I turn to first on my iPad. I’m looking forward to seeing how well it performs on my new iPad Air, since Jackie’s review suggests a lot of the processing is now being handled by the graphics processor.

iPhoto 2.0 Syncs with Camera Roll, Can Delete and Hide Images

Federico Viticci at Macstories writes about a very interesting change in Apple’s latest iPhoto 2.0 app for iPhone and iPad. In the first version of iPhoto for iOS, images you edit stay in iPhoto unless you explicitly share them back to the Camera Roll. This situation applies to other applications, too, due to the sandboxing security architecture that keeps apps separated in their own virtual workspaces.

iPhoto 2.0, however, manages to tunnel under the sandbox walls and updates edited photos in the Camera Roll without any additional export step. If you view the image in the Photos app and tap the Edit button, you can edit the original.

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In another great move, you can now delete photos from the Camera Roll from within iPhoto: Tap the More button (which looks like an outlined ellipses … ) in the bottom-right corner and choose Delete. There’s also an option to hide a photo from view in iPhoto there.

Go read Federico’s article for more details. Currently this functionality doesn’t seem to be accessible by third-party developers, but I’m hoping it doesn’t stay Apple-only.

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Article: Tips for iPad Photo Retouching

iPad RetouchingThe iPad is a great photo viewer, but does it have enough oomph to handle photo retouching? Yes! In my latest article at Peachpit.com, I look at several ways to edit photos on the iPad, including red-eye removal, removing unwanted objects in the image, and compositing: Tips for iPad Photo Retouching

iPad Photo Workflow—The Mongol Rally

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Are you thinking about taking just an iPad on a trip? How about a driving adventure through Asia in an absurdly small car? Ben Long undertook the Mongol Rally and writes about his choice to bring only an iPad to work with his photos of the excursion: “Putting the iPad Photo Workflow to the Test: The Mongol Rally.”

Broken exhausts, punctured tires, lack of a good histogram—these are the kinds of problems an iPad-based photographer faces on an event such as the Mongol Rally, a charity road rally that I have been participating in for the last nineteen days.

I’m a fan of Ben’s work, and this article is excellent.

Goodbye PhotoForge and KitCam: Yahoo Buys Ghostbird

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Yahoo is buying Ghostbird Software, the makers of the PhotoForge 2 editing app and KitCam, an iPhone photo capture app, to improve Flickr. According to a report at PetaPixel, the apps are being pulled from the App Store and won’t be updated. If you own them already, they can still be used. It sounds like Yahoo is buying the company for its engineering talent, and technologies from the apps will probably find their way into Flickr apps.

I almost chose PhotoForge 2 as the example program for the editing chapter of the book, but at the time I was writing it (late 2011), the app’s results just weren’t very good. I liked its interface and approach, but that doesn’t mean anything when the adjustments it makes are sub-par. Instead, I turned to Photogene, which I stuck with in the second edition as well.

I’ve liked Flickr’s resurgence since Marissa Meyer took over at Yahoo, and hope this means even better software for Flickr. But it’s also too bad the apps are being mothballed. When Google acquired Snapseed, I feared that it would also die, but so far it’s still available (and free!). However, the company killed the Mac version, so I can’t completely rest easy that the iOS version will survive long-term.

Meet iPhoto for iOS

20130101-142337.jpgLooking for more detail about editing photos on the iPad or iPhone with Apple’s iPhoto for iOS? My friend Lisa L. Spangenberg has published a new ebook, Meet iPhoto for iOS. I find myself using iPhoto quite often when editing photos on the iPad. The book is only $5, and available from the iBookstore, Barnes & Noble (Nook format), and direct from Peachpit Press.

With this practical and invaluable guide, you’ll learn how to polish and share off your photos. Learn how to get images onto your iOS device; work with photos, albums, and events; edit and adjust photos; and share your finished work.