Google Acquires Snapseed Developer

Very interesting: According to The Verge, Google is buying Nik Software, creators of the excellent photo-editing app Snapseed. The folks who work directly with Snapseed are moving from San Diego to Google’s Mountain View, CA headquarters to work on Google+.

I’m guessing an Android version of the app is almost completed internally, and Google will focus its efforts on offering a top-flight image editor based on Snapseed. But I also hope this doesn’t mean the iOS and Mac versions wither as a result.

[If you don't already own my book, here's a sample chapter that explains how to edit photos in Snapseed.]

Modern Photo Convenience

My daughter’s daycare starts the school year by asking parents to bring in a bunch of photos—of family members, friends, house, and other things that help express who each kid is. The photos are sometimes trimmed and turned into a collage, then mounted on a long wall for everyone to see.

If you’re like me, you can see where this is going. Photos… printed on paper? I never print photos anymore, and don’t own—nor have the desire to buy—a photo printer. And, of course, because I wasn’t paying attention, the daycare needed the photos today.

This is why I love living in the modern world. It turned out to be no problem.

I pulled the images together that I wanted (some from Lightroom, some lying about on my Mac desktop, some already on my iOS devices) and uploaded them to Walgreens, a national drugstore chain that has several locations near me. It turned out to be more convenient for me to do this on my Mac today, but I could have easily also used the Walgreens for iPad app, which I discuss in the book.

I uploaded the image files, chose how many copies of each print I wanted, and placed the order. I specified that I wanted to pick up the prints at a Walgreens just a few blocks away from the coffee shop where I was working this morning. The total cost was about $2, and I paid with a credit card online.

Less than 30 minutes later, I received an email telling me the prints were ready for pickup. A short walk later on the way to lunch, I had the prints in hand, and they look great. At no point did I have to worry about printer ink, dropping off negatives or digital files, or even working with an in-store kiosk.

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